The Contisuyo Archaeological Lab School in Peru will provide students valuable experience studying abroad and conducting bioarchaeological and archaeological research. This program provides anthropology and archaeology majors an opportunity to earn 6 credits toward their major in a foreign country. The program gives students laboratory experience in artifact handling, conservation, cataloging, and basic analysis of ceramic, lithic, fauna, and textiles, as well as Human Osteology.

Students will receive 7 credits for two courses: ATY 479: Analysis of Archaeological Data (3 credits) and ATY 453: Human Osteology (4 credits). These classes are significant for graduates with an anthropology or archaeology degree that wish to work in Cultural Resource Management or attend graduate school to study archaeology or forensics. Students who do not take such courses will not be competitive in the workplace or in the application process to graduate school. Since such experiences are vital to an archaeological career, ATY 479 may be repeated for credit.

Students will participate in laboratory analyses targeted to answer significant anthropological questions. We will be examining materials recovered during a rescue project by professional Peruvian archaeologists. Sadly, they were not allotted the resources to study this large, amazing collection. This research will answer a number of important questions regarding the transitions that took place when Wari and Tiwanaku withdrew from the valley (ca. AD 1000) and later when the Inka conquered the region (ca. AD 1450).

Program Dates: June 25 - August 5, 2023 Location: Moquegua, Peru Cost: $4,200 Application Deadline: December 1, 2022

Program cost includes: cost of instruction by UNCG faculty, room, board, local transportation, and excursions. Program cost does NOT include: airfare (approx. $1,200) and spending money (approx. $400). The amounts provided for these categories are estimates.

Prospective program applicants must have an overall GPA of 2.8 with at least one previous course in anthropology or archaeology. Students should be in good health and sufficient physical condition to hike daily for 30 minutes with a day pack. Students will be walking in Moquegua to various laboratories and have weekly field trips that including hiking. Spanish skills are preferred, but not required. A limited number of scholarships are available for this program.

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Field school's sexual harassment policy as submitted

Sexual Harassment, as defined by 34 CFR 106.30, is: conduct on the basis of sex that satisfies one or more of the following: An employee conditioning the provision of an aid, benefit, or service on an individual’s participation in unwelcome sexual conduct; Unwelcome conduct determined by a reasonable person to be so severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive that it effectively denies a person equal access to the recipient’s education program or activity; or “Sexual assault “[1] as defined in 20 U.S.C. 1092 (f)(6)(A)(v), “dating violence”[2] as defined in 34 U.S.C. 12291(a)(10), “domestic violence”[3] as defined in 34 U.S.C. 12291(a)(8), or “stalking”[4] as defined in 34 U.S.C. 12291(a)(30). [1] Sexual Assault: An offense classified as a forcible or nonforcible sex offense under the uniform crime reporting system of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Sex Offenses, Forcible- Any sexual act directed against another person, without the consent of the victim including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent. Forcible Rape- (Except Statutory Rape) The carnal knowledge of a person, forcibly and/or against that person’s will or not forcibly or against the person’s will in instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of their temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity. Forcible Sodomy- Oral or anal sexual intercourse with another person, forcibly and/or against that person’s will or not forcibly against that person’s will in instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of their youth or because of their temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity. Sexual Assault With An Object- To use an object or instrument to unlawfully penetrate, however slightly, the genital or anal opening of the body of another person, forcibly and/or against that person’s will or not forcibly or against the person’s will in instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of their youth or because of their temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity. Forcible Fondling- The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, forcibly and/or against that person’s will or not forcibly or against the person’s will in instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent. [2] Violence committed by a person- (a) who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim; and (b) where the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on a consideration of the following factors: The length of the relationship; The type of relationship; The frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. [3] Felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence committed by a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim, by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner, by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic of family violence laws of the jurisdiction receiving grant monies, or by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction. [4] Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to (a) fear for his or her safety or the safety of others; or (b) suffer substantial emotional distress.

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